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Increased focus on resistant bacteria

Tork uses knowledge as a key asset in our quest of continuously providing complete solutions and become even more relevant to our customers and end users. In trend update, we share some of the findings.

The development of antibiotic resistant bacteria is considered to be one of the great future global threats, and should be treated with great respect. However, this phenomenon has existed ever since Alexander Fleming discovered antibiotics in 1929. All antibiotics produced since then have after a few years been replaced by others, since certain bacteria have developed resistances.

By destroying bacteria’s cellular walls, or interfering with its vital proteins, antibiotics have the capability to fight bacterial infections. Some bacteria though, have adapted to survive doses which would previously have killed them. ESLB bacteria for example, have developed the capacity to produce enzymes that break down the antibiotics.

A bacterium can be resistant against a single antibiotic, a group of antibiotics, or a broad spectrum consisting of many different types of antibiotics. However, it is extremely rare for a single bacterium to be immune against all available antibiotics. Usually it is still possible to treat most infections, although antibiotics which carry a higher risk of side effects may be required.

Some eighty years have passed since the first antibiotics, but hand hygiene is still an easy and very effective way of keeping the threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria at bay, and preventing transmission from one person to another. Just as other microbes, resistant bacteria can be removed from the hands by washing with soap and water and drying with a paper towel, or killed by using an alcohol hand sanitizer[1]. Surfaces can be cleaned with ordinary cleaning products; surfaces which are likely to come in contact with exposed skin or food may need to be disinfected as well[2].

1. CDC fact sheet. Personal prevention of MRSA skin infections. Available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/prevent/personal.html
2. CDC fact sheet. Environmental cleaning and disinfection for MRSA. Available online at: http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/environment/index.html
"Just as other microbes, resistant bacteria can be removed from the hands by washing with soap and water and drying with a paper towel, or killed by using an alcohol hand sanitizer. Surfaces can be cleaned with ordinary cleaning products; surfaces which are likely to come in contact with exposed skin or food may need to be disinfected as well."